On Absence

Dying, I suppose, is an inevitable part of being alive. We write about death all the time; in our speech, we say “I’m gonna kill you”; “Oh, I feel like death…”, and so forth. We never really appreciate the full gravitas of what we say. This isn’t just limited to death however; we misunderstand, or at least fail to appreciate the full significance of an idea, or a word, on a regular basis. We just never realise the full potential of what we are saying.

However, when people do disappear, whether they die, or you just lose contact with them, it’s an inexplicable feeling. It’s horrible, because you feel like something is missing. And that’s reasonable, because something is missing. There’s a part of your life that has changed; that change is often set in stone, and that’s just a part of life. People change on the basis of loss, and how they cope with it.

Humans are incredible to the extent that we can adapt to a hostile environment, and change accordingly. We wouldn’t be able to exist on a planet that fundamentally exists on the basis of change if we couldn’t; we have to just roll with the punches, and salvage what we can from the mess we leave behind us. Even the most hygienic, tidy and scrupulous human being leaves mess in their wake. I’m not talking about leaving tea cups, crisp packets and toast crumbs behind you; I mean emotional mess; the stack of relationships, friends, people that we find in our wake. We always have an impact on the people we care about. We also have an impact on people we barely even recognize.

Equally, our people leave us in their wake; they change our expectations of the world around us, for better, or for worse. We have to know what it means to be sad in order to be a whole, rounded person. People that are perpetually happy, all the time won’t know how strong they are until they have to come back from something vile, something impossible. You cannot possibly know how strong you are until you have to be strong.

So people, in absence, is terrifying, horrible; it is impossibly cruel. Especially when people are young, and they die far, far too young. People lose their kids, their wives, and their husbands. Those people are full of a strength that people have to find for themselves; it cannot be learnt, and it cannot be studied from a book. “A degree from the university of life”, one might say. Because that’s what it is; it’s life, and life is scary. I don’t know very much about life; I’m eighteen. But I know a little bit, just enough to know it’s scary, and the things I have seen barely scratch the surface of the things I may see, one day.

I think then, in conclusion, you should say what you think; appreciate people. Know that you have to be sad sometimes, in order to be strong. That’s the really hard part. Standing up and realising that life goes on, whether you want it to or not. I suppose you just have to appreciate life, and the fact that you’re in it, whilst you can. Do stuff; be something, and don’t waste it.

“Did you say it? ‘I love you. I don’t ever want to live without you. You changed my life.’ Did you say it? Make a plan. Set a goal. Work towards it. But every now and then, look around, and drink it in. Because this is it. And it might all be gone tomorrow.” – Grey’s Anatomy

I realise the quote is horribly cheesy, directly quoted from television drama; but I still think it’s a very nice message to put across.

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6 thoughts on “On Absence

  1. Or even, dead as in “dead dull” becoming a general enhancer, so we get “pure dead brilliant”. Language grows by metaphor, but yes sometimes the dialect needs purified. As for Grey’s Anatomy, I prefer House, myself, but these programmes work by dealing with emotional situations in a heightened way, to keep you watching, and so they do cover all sorts of things and even some wisdom, like your quote. Next time, English student, quote George Eliot!

    • I agree with you about dialect. It goes back to what I’ve mentioned on here before about language and being continuously in flux. It is not always for the better however; consider how the term “gay” has evolved over centuries.

      Thank you for reading!
      Sarah Alice
      (:

  2. Beautiful post, Sarah Alice. One of my favorites of yours so far! The Grey’s Anatomy quote was good. 🙂 Don’t feel insecure about it…embrace it!

    Death touched me for the first time, and I feel like I hear a ghost at times… It’s a strange feeling.

    • I’m really sorry to hear that. I hope you’re okay. 😦

      I’m glad you liked the post; it was inspired by some of my old school friends passing on very recently. It’s a very strange feeling to quite literally grow up with somebody, and then realise that they won’t ever get to be anything more. I find that impossible to accept.

      Thank you very much for reading!
      Sarah Alice
      (:

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