Supporting Photographers!

Yesterday, my lovely flatmate, Sam, updated his blog with all of the work he’s put into his first year of BA Hons Press and Editorial Photography. His work is fantastic, and I’ve never seen anyone so committed to a particular course. It’s remarkable how myself and other flatmates moan around exam time about the complexities of our course, and Sam just gets on with making workbooks, and hanging out in the dark room. He put an awful lot of effort into work this year, even securing freelance work for companies such as Student Surf Tour.

So, please have a look at his blog, its brilliant!

http://samuelshrimpton.blogspot.co.uk/

(:

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On Waiting, and Trying Again

The problem with being a potential candidate for something, is that there are also other, potential candidates. They all want the same thing; you all have the same goal. They probably all want it just as much as you do. They probably worked just as hard on their articles as you did. They probably researched just as thoroughly, as you did too. So how can you possibly play the guessing game? You can’t, is the reality of it. Sure, you can add up the possibilities; you can endlessly rake over your work, look at things you could have done better; you can reread, as much as you like, but the reality is that you can’t change the article you’ve already submitted.

Latest photo of myself... (1)

The same sort of thing happens at job interviews, and in the case of being a student, the question is not whether you are good at your job or not, or how much experience you may have; it’s about your ability to be able to work consistently, throughout the year. And in the course of being a student, I live on the other side of the country to home. Which means that I would not be able to work during the holidays, because I have a job at home to go back to, and a family, that I like to see at least every three months. However, employers aren’t satisfied with having you for nine months of the year; if they want to hire you, they want it to be on a consistent basis. This is currently one of the challenges I am facing, in finding a job down at university; even pubs seem to be looking for permanent, and not absentee-for-three-months-a-year staff. This, coupled with the present state of the job market, makes part-time employment increasingly more difficult to obtain.

This tirade, you might say, was somewhat unprovoked; however in my little (exhausted) mind, it all made perfect sense, because I’ve been submitting applications left, right and centre. It sounds petty, and it sounds pathetic to be so cross, about this, but it’s a journey that seems futile. Having recently read Mr. Palomar as well, things are certainly feeling a bit futile; the man’s constant existentialist crisis makes me want to shout at him, and ask, (almost) politely, whether he has a real problem. A debt collector, or an illegitimate child, perhaps. Anything that would motivate him, to actually do something. And this is entirely the problem; even when you do everything, all the time, it doesn’t always work out perfectly.

But nevertheless, even though I’m not feeling optimistic today, due to a combination of being tired, my muscles hurting, and being buried under a pile of work, it will “all come to he who waits”, as my mother often says. A phrase that has annoyed me since I was about twelve years old. I hope she continues to be right; it would be beautiful timing to end the trend of “Mum is always right” now. Anyway, chin up, chuck.

(:

(1) http://www.routerfreak.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/frustration.jpg

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On Investment

Lately, I’ve been repeating “it’s all about the dream” to myself in an effort to maintain a degree of motivation. I repeat it especially frequently at seven in the morning, and during lengthy cross trainer or hill walker sessions. I’ve even turned into a cliché, and written it onto my mirror. It’s true however; everything I’m doing at the moment, including designing a prototype magazine, training hard, working on my degree, has a foundation in the future. This is something of an oxymoron, however, it’s perfectly true; my world is finding it’s foundation in the future. It’s an investment in the world.

Investment seems to be something of a touchy subject in the wake of our current economic climate; people who had invested in property have temporarily lost a vast amount of potential capital, and people who had simply locked their savings into bank accounts have suffered some degree of loss, or at least an affected interest rate. The older generation are suffering on the pensions schemes, and the young people are suffering under the loan companies and the rising cost of education. And therefore one can only ask whether we can ever truly invest in the future. We can’t predict the long-term effects of economic downturn, or how long it might last, and how severe it might be. There are entire organisations dedicated to trying to establish patterns of economy, however financially, and in many other ways, the future is decidedly uncertain.

However, to not invest in property, education, etc, is far more dangerous than doing so; one can hope to skate by on good grace and charm, and unfortunately, I have friends who have quite literally skated through school and accidentally fallen into the laps of insurance companies, accountancy apprenticeships, etc. There are people in the world who are apparently automatically blessed; they just acquire opportunity with little to no effort. I think half of this is a situational advantage; some people end up lucky and simply fall into being in the right place, at exactly the right time.

Changing and investing. (1)

The rest of us however, are investing. Employability events. Optional lectures. Extra reading. Extra curricular projects. Getting up in the morning. It’s all part of the grand effort to become something in a climate that seems determined to force young people into unemployment. One of my pet peeves in the employment sector is when you are told “you haven’t enough experience”. The question of course being, “how on earth might I acquire this experience, if you are not willing to invest in me?”. I don’t think it’s really entirely about us, investing in ourselves. I think it’s also about employers, older people, and lecturers, investing the time in us to teach us, and to lend us the experience. Those who are willing are continually asking for opportunities ought to be rewarded, in a world of equals. There won’t ever be enough spaces to accommodate everyone, and that’s okay; we just need a fighting chance to gain some of the experience that we seem to lack.

So, today I’m hoping people will invest more in us; we’re willing to work hard and to learn, because we want to be you one day. We want to be the people to invest in the young people. It’s a cycle though; we need a leg up, so we can be just like you, when we grow up.

(:

(1) http://uffenorde.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/breakRules1920x1080.jpg

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